Reviews
 
 
 
 
  1. “Director-adaptor Dalton cannily decided to tell the Pinafore story as in Gilbert’s “Picture Book,” with a child-friendly narrator filling in details and motivations between the songs.”
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  7. “Oh joy, oh rapture, oh Gilbert and Sullivan. H.M.S. Pinafore may be stripped down here, but it’s still as charming as ever.”
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  13. “Dalton's conceit for the production affords contemporary audiences the chance to revisit a classic in pleasantly unstuffy mode”
  14.                                                         - American Theater Web
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  2. “an evening of devious entertainment”
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  11. What does take shape? The strongest plays in the first series were the least overtly political. One, “Hero,” by Deirdre O’Connor, gets under way in the bedroom of a young woman about to go off somewhere. Her boyfriend, a grocery store clerk, would clearly like her to stay, but she is determined. We think, for a moment, that she is heading to war, but she is really preparing to participate in a reality television show, something in the vein of “Survivor” and that she hopes will make her famous.
  12. The play isn’t intended as farce; it is meant to evoke a universe of diminished opportunity, and when the girl, Natalie, tells her boyfriend that going off to live on leaves or whatever she is going to do is “literally the most important thing in the world,” we oddly find ourselves believing her.
  13.                                                         - New York Times
 
 
 
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  2. “its most seductive one acts”
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H.M.S. Pinafore
Nominated for Drama Desk Outstanding Revival of a Musical “Hero” in Armed and Naked in America “Penicillin” and “A Twist So Shocking...” in The Mag-7 Dog in the Manger
Copyright 2011 by Dave Dalton  All rights reserved
The Threepenny Opera
    “He's invented staging — especially a wonderfully deranged segment using plastic Ken-
    and Barbie-type dolls in Act 1 and a tango bit later on and a finale that makes use of a
    large man on a small rocking horse”
                                                        -Hartford Advocate
Ring Cycle, Parts 1+2
    The most surprising thing about this lean, scrappy prose reimagining, at the
    Bushwick Starr in Brooklyn, isn’t that two lengthy operas are dispatched in 90 minutes
    but that this cheeky adaptation, by Dave Dalton, Jeremy Beck and the company,
    addresses Wagner’s agenda with remarkable sensitivity and insight.
                                                        -New York Times